Down and Synthetic Bootie/Sock Comparison Chart

On my recent camping trip with my son, he complained about having cold feet. This isn’t the first time he’s had trouble keeping his feet warm, so I thought I would look into investing in some down- or synthetic-filled sleeping booties, slippers, or socks. Here is a little comparison chart if, like me, you’ve been looking for a single source for all down booties on the market.

Did I miss one? Send me and email so I can keep this chart current.


Down and Synthetic Bootie Comparison Chart

Item Weight Cost Fill Power Sole Info
Arrowhead Equipment Flame Thrower Socks 2.5 oz (71 g) $65 800 Goose Soft Over the ankle
Enlightened Equipment Sleeping Booty  1.5 oz (43 g) $50 CLIMASHIELD Soft Over the ankle
EXPED Down Booty  5 oz (142 g) ~$150 840 Goose Soft Over the ankle
Feathered Friends Down Booties  9.3 oz (264 g) $89 800 Goose Durable, waterproof Mid-calf, removable insole
Goose Feet Gear Down Socks 2.5 oz (71 g) $65 850 Goose Soft Over the ankle
Forty Below Camp Booties  10 oz (283 g) $70 Wiggy’s Lamilite® Rubber dot fabric Removable CCF insole; Over the ankle; fits into boot shell
Jacks R Better Down Sleeves 5 oz (142 g) $80 800 DWR Goose Soft Modular
MEC Expedition Booties 6 oz (170 g) $85 SL100 Hyperloft Abrasion-resistant sole Over the calf. GORE-TEX Windstopper shell.
Nunatak Teanaway Slipper  3.5 oz (100 g) $133 800 Goose Hard wearing rand material Ankle
Nunatak Chugach Booties 6 oz (170 g) $149 800 Goose Hard wearing rand material Over the ankle
Nunatak Kangri Down Mukluks  8 oz (227 g) $183 800 Goose Hard wearing rand material Over the calf
RAB Expedition Slippers  8 oz (227 g) $175 800 Goose Soft Over the ankle
RAB Expedition Modular Boot  23 oz (652 g) $275 800 Goose Durable, removable Mid-calf, water-resistant Pertex Endurance shell
RAB Hot Socks  5 oz (135 g) $65 Primaloft Soft Over the ankle
REI Down Booties  N/A $45 450 Duck Polyester, polyurethane beads Over the ankle (out of production)
Western Mountaineering Flash Down Booties  3 oz (85 g) $65 800 Goose Soft 1/4″ EV50 foam insole; ankle high
Western Mountaineering Standard  6 oz (170 g) $85 800 Goose Soft Over the ankle
Western Mountaineering Expedition  8 oz (227 g) $110 800 Goose 70 denier coated nylon rand Calf
Wiggy’s Booties N/A $42 Wiggy’s Lamilite® 1000 denier Cordura Over the ankle
Yeti Sundown 4 oz (118 g) $80 700 Goose Soft with anti-slip silicon print Over the ankle

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8 Responses

  1. RJones says:

    Hi Derek: This is just right up my alley. I just got back from my first ever hang trip. 2 nights in alpine and one night at the beach in Washington State. i too had chilly feet and used REI’s down booties one night and they worked fine. The third night to save space I used a pair of neoprene socks instead of the booties. These worked better, saved space and kept my feet warm all night. I would go with the neoprene socks instead of the booties…much cheaper and takes up less space.
    BTW, I went with the Grand Trunk SB Pro hammock, GT’s “Funky” Tarp, and GT’s Tree Slings. Everything worked well for me. I’m officially a hanger now, and will try hammocking in all conditions as I continue to avoid tenting. Thanks for your great tips. Now I will be able to re-read your book with more of an understanding since I’ve now spent three nights in a hammock.
    I am 6’3″ 280lbs and the GT felt like i had plenty of room and plenty of strength for me.

    Sincerely

    Richard Jones

  2. silentorpheus says:

    For reference – I have a pair of REI down booties, size XL, purchased 2 years ago. They weigh in at 357g (12.5oz). Not sure why they don’t include the weight in the specs on REI’s site.

  3. Joe says:

    I am a huge EE supporter and find it interesting that Tim chooses to make a climashield option. Reading his reasoning certainly makes sense. Feet sweet and down doesn’t like moisture. What are your thoughts on down verse synthetic for the feet?

    • Derek says:

      I’ve been reading mixed reviews. Some folks swear that wearing socks AND down booties feels colder than just bare feet in the booties. Some recommend a light sock liner to reduce oils and dirt getting in to the down. I find that down is warmer and quicker to react than synthetic, but there are places and conditions where synthetic is better. I like fleece, for example, as an insulating layer because I don’t have to worry about sweating or treating my clothes too tenderly. I have a pair of synthetic insulated pants that I really like. It may be that I go with a synthetic sock as well.

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