DIY Jacks “R” Better Weather Shield

You may also like...

11 Responses

  1. Juan Morales says:

    Nice and multifunction, cheaper than the UQ protector of 2QZQ…

  2. Joe says:

    I bought the JRB mod kit to put on my DD poncho and looking forward to starting the project (no sewing skills at all here). My question is how much warmth does this add alone as a sort of UQ (and I realize this is wildly subjective so I suppose I am asking just personal opinion)? I am new to hammock camping in general and wanting to pair this with my GT UL hammock and potentially a JRB 1/4″ torso pad. With the DD poncho mod only what temp rating would you give it? With the 1/4″ torso pad only? and finally with the 2 combined?

    • Derek says:

      I’ve been using the Weather Shield over the past week to coax a 30-degree quilt down to the twenties. It works. The shield by itself could be used in hot climates that have high diurnal shifts to keep you from getting cold butt syndrome. I would say with overnight lows in the 60s it would be enough for many people.

      Your other questions will be too speculative for me to answer. You’re going to have to test and see if they meet your conditions.

      When I first started hammock camping all I had was pads and sleeping bags. This worked in some pretty cold country in temps as low as 15 degrees. You can stack pads to boost warmth for colder conditions, just like you would for sleeping on the ground. I would recommend getting a $7 blue foam pad from Walmart and cut it in half, using one half turned 90-degrees to wrap around your shoulders while using your other pads under your torso (giving you double thickness in your torso and rear area) and a half pad under your legs.

      The Weather Shield really helps by cutting drafts and wind gusts, along with ground splashes and side-driven precipitation. By creating a pocket of dead air space between you and the hammock, the Weather Shield can add a few degrees (maybe as much as 10) of warmth.

      Always test in your backyard first to make sure your system is working well for you.

  3. Alex says:

    What is the purpose of the elastic straps on the side?

    • Derek says:

      They keep the sides tensioned so they seal better and aren’t floppy.

      • Alex says:

        Ah, got it now. You can see it in the bottom left part of the illustration where it’s connected to the guy line.

        One other question, in the PLUQ post comments you suggest that the method above is the best option for putting together the PLUQ if you want it to be multi-use as both a top and under quilt. I was curious, do you still fold it in half? If so, do you sew another grosgrain loop in the center of the short sides?

        Thanks,
        Alex

  4. Ric Komarek says:

    in the PLUQ post comments you suggest that the method above is the best option for putting together the PLUQ if you want it to be multi-use as both a top and under quilt. I was curious, do you still fold it in half? If so, do you sew another grosgrain loop in the center of the short sides?

  5. Dave says:

    In your write-up, you had your bacon saved by using the poncho as an overcover – presumably letting the water enter the hammock bed. How did you keep your underquilt dry then?

  1. September 25, 2013

    […] DIY Jacks “R” Better Weather Shield […]

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: