Hammock Trip Report – IPP Community Center in Delta, Utah

Hammock Trip Report – IPP Community Center in Delta, Utah

This past summer my family hosted a reunion at the famed IPP Community Center in Delta, Utah (850 Brush Wellman Road, Delta, UT). Yes, it’s in the middle of nowhere and it seems like a crazy place to have a reunion, but the facility is pretty amazing and the price is reasonable (untouchable), especially if you’ve got a big family or group event. In fact, the center is in such high demand that we had to reserve the place a year in advance. If you’re looking for a spacious summer gathering location, complete with an enormous commercial kitchen with multiple walk-in freezers, spacious dining hall, full basketball court, two racquetball courts, sleeping rooms, and a game room (with table tennis, multiple pool tables, and a TV), you might just consider the IPP Community Center in Delta, Utah.

The problem I found in doing any sort of research on this place is that there was so little intel online! Pictures are scarce. There is no official website, and you sorta-kinda have to know someone to get much information. Maybe it’s suppose to stay a secret? Like Area 51?

Well, I was determined to sleep in a hammock while there, but I wasn’t sure what we would find. The center is surrounded by trees, so there are ample spots to hang hammocks outside, but the automatic sprinkler system engages every night, taking that option off the table. Indoors, the options are limited. The best spot I found was in the loft above the racquetball courts, where open pillars around the stairs and eye bolts provided sturdy hanging points.

I decided to make this post more as a resource for other families who are doing any research on the IPP Community Center so they can see a little more clearly what to expect.

I should note that there are no beds in the center. There are a few small rooms that can be closed off to make private sleeping rooms, but be advised to bring cots or inflatable mattress pads. The loft, where I hung the hammocks, is large and can fit dozens of people. When it was built, the center was the hub of activity for a much larger community that supplied the personnel that built the nearby power plant. The dorm buildings that surrounded the center have long since been torn down, so all that is left is a spacious parking lot, outdoor tennis courts, basketball courts, trees, and the central building. There are RV hookups if you bring a trailer.

The center is staffed during the day, but it’s fairly low key and we didn’t feel imposed on.

The center is feeling its age. The décor has a yellow / burnt sienna motif and trim has a decided late-1970s vibe. There are areas that show signs of repeated wear and use, but overall the center is in remarkable condition. It would have been interesting to see it during its hey-day.

It is possible to arrange a tour of the power plant; just inquire at the front gate or call the front desk (435) 864-4414. That’s also the number to make a reservation at the center.

 

2 Responses

  1. Dave says:

    It’s not terribly clear from the pictures – how did you hook up to the beams? Were there bolts existing, or did you bring some hardware?

    • Derek Hansen says:

      There is a large eye bolt where multiple hammocks are clipped. I think a punching bag may have been hung there at one time. It’s a serious bolt right into the steel pillar. The other hammocks re just looped over large bolts.

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